I Walk These Streets Alone: The Lyrics

I Walk These Streets Alone: The Lyrics

The scorching sun affords me only…

I Walk These Streets Alone: The Music

I Walk These Streets Alone: The Music

I love the feel, the sounds, the length, the abandon, the experimentation, the…

Will You Still Be Mine Tonight: The Lyrics, Pt. 2

Will You Still Be Mine Tonight: The Lyrics, Pt. 2

As Patty Smyth and Don Henley once sang, “sometimes love just ain’t…

Will You Still Be Mine Tonight: The Lyrics, Pt. 1

Will You Still Be Mine Tonight: The Lyrics, Pt. 1

“Will you still be mine tonight?”  Words that I really…

Will You Still Be Mine Tonight: The Music, Pt. 2

Will You Still Be Mine Tonight: The Music, Pt. 2

With a new tenor ukulele in hand, some newfound information and…

Will You Still Be Mine Tonight: The Music, Pt. 1

Will You Still Be Mine Tonight: The Music, Pt. 1

I bought my father a ukulele for Christmas one year.  Yeah, I know…

Funny How The Time Goes By: The Lyrics

Funny How The Time Goes By: The Lyrics

Funny how time goes by, isn’t it? During the time…

Funny How The Time Goes By: The Music

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I know it more every day, and as I sit writing this I am acutely aware of it.

 

You see, I am supposed to write about how I came to the music part of the song, but the truth is that I simply do not recall.

What I do know, and somewhat remember is that it was clear back 2007 ways, that it was a response to my (ex)wife leaving me for a time, and that it was supposed to be the peculiar juxtaposition of the word funny with the sadness of the song.

And I remember going to the studios at Full Sail University in Winter Park, FL to record the guitar parts.  This part of my memory is fully intact.

You see, I knew this was a different piece for me, and I wanted a very particular mic’ed guitar sound, and wanted it to be done well.  I had heard that you could get time at Full Sail University Studios for students who are learning, and I applied, booked time and set out, tracks in hand, to lay down the guitar parts.

First off, let me say that the instructor and the students were great!  I realize I sat in a learning environment, but they went to town at getting my Taylor NS42CE mic’ed up perfectly.  And, when I asked for something specific - that is, a mic to record near my ear, not near the guitar, since that is what I am used to hearing when I play - the instructor said “that’s a great idea” and the students set it up.

We recorded a few different passes after getting a good check on my headphones, and then worked on the set up to do the lead parts.

I played my Taylor 410RCE 25th Anniversary edition steel string acoustic also, and it was a joy to listen to as they worked with me.

The engineer played producer a bit, having me add harmonies to my lead, even though I hadn’t planned on it.  Worked out beautifully, and you can hear it in the song. I am grateful for the input.

 

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